Laugh and Learn

Everything’s Trash, But it’s Okay by Phoebe Robinson; 2018; $26.00; 324 pages; Plume, New York, NY; 978-0-525-53414-3; checked out from the Multnomah County Library, Hollywood; 11/21/18-11/30/18

Why did I read this?  Because I read Ms. Robinson’s first book and laughed a lot, learned a lot and was jolted by some of what I read.

Once again Phoebe Robinson uses her life to teach others about racism, sexism and other isms.  She does it while making  you laugh and think at the same time.  Some of the stuff she tells about makes me angry and wonder how people can be so stupid to believe some of the things they do and do some of the things they do.

10/10

What is with the title of the review?  The author has a lot of insights into life, with those insights come some good laughs along with some learning.

 

sounds like now

Long Road to Mercy by David Baldacci; 2018; $29.00; 405 pages; Grand Central Publishing, New York, NY; 978-1-5387-6157-1; checked out from Multnomah County Library, Rockwood; 11/19/18-11/21/18

Why did I read this?  Because David Baldacci is a great storyteller and this is the first book in a new series from him.

Atlee Pine is a FBI agent in the middle of nowhere Arizona, but her section of wilderness includes the Grand Canyon National Park.  When a mule is found slaughtered at the Phantom Ranch with the initials JK carved into it’s hide and one guest from the Ranch is missing Atlee begins to investigate, however just as she and her Administrative Assistant are starting to look into the case she is mysteriously called off the case and a couple of Park Service Rangers are reassigned to another Park.  Atlee and Carol, the aforementioned Assistant, decide to investigate off the record.  As they do witnesses are mysteriously kidnapped or killed.  Their investigation takes them across the country and to the bottom of the Grand Canyon before they uncover a conspiracy that threatens to involve the United States in another war.  Along with this case Atlee is also dealing with a childhood trauma.  The author surrounds Atlee Pine with a strong set of supporting characters including Carol and Sam, a former Special Forces soldier turned Park Ranger.

10/10

What is with the title of the review?  I think there are always some people in our government who would like the U.S. to be involved in a war so that it would line their pockets.

The bromance continues

Hope Never Dies by Andrew Shaffer;2018; $14.99; 301 pages; Quirk Books, Philadelphia, PA; 978-1-68369-039-9; checked out from Multnomah County Library, Albina; 11/16/18-11/19/18

Why did I read this?  It really appealed to my sense of humor.

Joe Biden’s friend Amtrak Conductor, Finn Donnelly, was found on an Amtrak railroad track.  Biden begins to investigate and starts to find clues to his death.  Barack Obama shows up with his Secret Service detail of one, Steve and begins to assist him.  As they did deeper we find out many levels of the First Bromance.  The story is a fun telling of good friends who have fallen apart for awhile when circumstances change.  As they work together they rekindle their bromance and solve the cast.

8/10

What is with the title of the review?  Many people spoke of the bromance between Barack Obama and Joe Biden.

Corner Reading Society nominee 2019

Whiskey When We’re Dry by John Larison; 2018; $26.00; 387 pages; Viking, New York, NY; 978-0-7352-2044-7; checked out from Multnomah County Library, Gresham; 11/4/18-11/10/18

Why did I read this?  I think I read a good review of the book.

This book had me engaged from the first two lines of the story.  This is the story of a young girl whose mother died in childbirth, whose brother runs away from home to become an outlaw and whose father died in a tragic horseback riding accident.  This is her adventure through the old west in which she encounters corruption, gender stereotyping and more.  It deals with gender roles, siblings, and more.  I can’t do the story justice, but this is one of the best books I have read this year.

What is with the title of the review?  I will be nominating this book to be read by the book group I am part of.

And now I know

The Bone and Sinew of the Land, America’s Forgotten Black Pioneers & The Struggle For Equality by Anna-Lisa Cox; 2018; $28.00; 280 pages; Public Affairs, New York, NY; 978-1-61039-810-7; Checked out from Multnomah County Library, Gresham; 10/26/18-11/2/18

Why did I read this? I read a good review of it somewhere.

In the early 1800’s many people of African descent moved to the Northwest Territories (Ohio, Indiana, Illinois) and started farms.  At the time they had equal rights with the white settlers and the African men even had the right to vote.  However over the years the whites began to roll back the rights of these people by imposing bonds on the people, taking away the right to vote and imposing segregation.  The book goes beyond the farmers and sets the context of what was going on around them.  Much of the attitudes are being seen again today.  Many of the actions of the people of that day are reflected in the actions of people today.

10/10

What is with the title of the review?  I learned a bunch of stuff by reading this.  Stuff I didn’t know.  Now I know.