I love and hate cliffhangers

Ranger’s Apprentice, The Royal Ranger, The Red Fox Clan by John Flanagan; 2018; $18.99; 346 pages; Philomel Books, New York, NY; 978-1-5247-4138-9; checked out from Multnomah County Library, North Portland; 1/21/19-1/23/19

Why did I read this?   Because I really enjoy reading the stories of John Flanagan.

This is the opposite end of the time spectrum from the last book I read.  In The Battle of Hackham Heath we were introduced to Will Treaty, now he is one of the senior Rangers in the Corp.  He is now training his own apprentice, Maddie.  What very people few know is that Maddie is actually the Princess Madelyn.  This gives the story an added layer as Maddie’s alter ego is able to gain intelligence as people think she is a typical spoiled Princess who is not very intelligent.  Their is a movement afoot who are trying to bring down the royal family.  Maddie is in an interesting predicament at the end of the story.  Her mother is trapped in a tower of her own castle while her father and most of the castle’s garrison are away and trapped in another fort in the far country. This story ends on a severe cliffhanger.

10/10

What is with the title of the review?  I like cliffhangers because they make me very interested in reading the next book, but I hate them because they don’t bring the story to a satisfactory conclusion.  The sequel is already out in Australia but won’t be published in the United States until May. However it looks like I may be getting it via China  a few months early.

down to three

The Three Secret Cities by Matthew Reilly; 2018; $26.99; 436 pages; Gallery Books, New York, NY; 978-1-5011-6719-5; checked out from Multmomah County Library, Midland; 12/7/18-12/9/18

Why did I read this?  Because it was the only thing that Matthew Reilly hadn’t read yet, plus he is a great storyteller, mixing the fantastical with reality.

Captain Jack West won the contest of champions in Four Legendary Kingdoms  and has upset some very powerful people from the past and present.  Jack and crew have to find three secret cities (guess that is where the title comes from) and perform specific tasks to prevent a global apocalypse while battling several different groups who want them dead for a variety of reasons.  Jack West would make a great movie, but each book is so complicated that you really couldn’t bring them to the screen.  Jack and his supporting characters are a great family of characters.

10/10

What is with the title of the review?  This series started with a seven in the title and we are now down to three, so the next book will be two something.

there really is no there there

Past Tense by Lee Child; 2018; $28.99; 382 pages; Delacorte Press, New York, NY; 978-0-399-59351-2; checked out from Multnomah County Library, Kenton; 11/30/18-12/3/18

Why did I read this?  I am a big fan of Lee Child and his creation, Jack Reacher and try to read them all.

Reacher is trying to get warm and heads for San Diego from New England.  He is distracted by a road sign that is for the town his father grew up in.  As usual there is trouble wherever Reacher travels. The town where Reachers father grew up is gone, now private property and returned to nature.  There are trees growing through the buildings.  Meanwhile what is left of Reachers family in the area, has started a hunting refuge for the wealthy.  Have to keep it quiet though, they are hunting the poor.  People are lured in and then hunted, but Reacher is there to help them.  As if that  is not enough Reacher has pissed off a mob boss from Boston and he is sending people to take out Reacher.  Oh and it appears that Reachers father, whom he thought was dead, may have returned to life.  Wow and somehow it all works together, remember Reacher does not look like that little actor that portrayed him and is much tougher than Ethan Hunt.

10/10

What is with the title of the review?  Gertrude Stein once said of her hometown, “there is no there there”, because the town no longer existed.  As Reacher looks for the town his father grew  up in, it is no longer there, nature has taken it back.

 

Laugh and Learn

Everything’s Trash, But it’s Okay by Phoebe Robinson; 2018; $26.00; 324 pages; Plume, New York, NY; 978-0-525-53414-3; checked out from the Multnomah County Library, Hollywood; 11/21/18-11/30/18

Why did I read this?  Because I read Ms. Robinson’s first book and laughed a lot, learned a lot and was jolted by some of what I read.

Once again Phoebe Robinson uses her life to teach others about racism, sexism and other isms.  She does it while making  you laugh and think at the same time.  Some of the stuff she tells about makes me angry and wonder how people can be so stupid to believe some of the things they do and do some of the things they do.

10/10

What is with the title of the review?  The author has a lot of insights into life, with those insights come some good laughs along with some learning.

 

Corner Reading Society nominee 2019

Whiskey When We’re Dry by John Larison; 2018; $26.00; 387 pages; Viking, New York, NY; 978-0-7352-2044-7; checked out from Multnomah County Library, Gresham; 11/4/18-11/10/18

Why did I read this?  I think I read a good review of the book.

This book had me engaged from the first two lines of the story.  This is the story of a young girl whose mother died in childbirth, whose brother runs away from home to become an outlaw and whose father died in a tragic horseback riding accident.  This is her adventure through the old west in which she encounters corruption, gender stereotyping and more.  It deals with gender roles, siblings, and more.  I can’t do the story justice, but this is one of the best books I have read this year.

What is with the title of the review?  I will be nominating this book to be read by the book group I am part of.