short term

West Like Lighting, The Brief Legendary Ride of the Pony Express by Jim DeFelice; 2018; $27.99; 357 pages; William Morrow, New York, NY; 978-0-06-249676-8; checked out from Multnomah County Library, Fairview; 8/27/18-6/1/18

Why did I ride this?  Because the old west intrigues me and the Pony Express is an almost mythological part of the history of the frontier of the United States.

The author takes us on an intriguing ride along the route of the Pony Express from St. Joseph, Missouri to San Francisco, California as the results of the 1860 Presidential election are being spread across the country.  We are introduced to riders, station managers, the Express owners, politicians, Native Americans, the countryside the ride traversed and a  sense of what the context of the times was.  This is so much more than just a history of the pony express, the author does a great job of putting the times in a context that makes sense.  I would recommend this who anyone is interested in the frontier history of the United States.

Grade 11/10

What is with the title of the review? The Pony Express only lasted for eighteen months and was only supposed to last until the transcontinental telegraph system was completed.  Its mythological footprint in the history of the United States is much  bigger than its actual impact on the United States.

What’s next

King and Maxwell by David Baldacci; 2013; $28.00; 419 pages; Grand Central Publishing, New York, NY; 978-1-4555-2131-9; checked out from Multnomah County Library,Troutdale; 8/25/18-8/27/18

Why did I read this?  Because I am reading my way through the various David Baldacci series and this is the latest in this series.

A career U.S. Army soldier disappears  with a over a billion dollars in Euros in Afghanistan and his son is told he is dead.  The son takes off running in the rain where he is almost hit by a car driven by King and Maxwell.  The son then receives an email from his supposedly dead Dad and engages the services of King and Maxwell.  As they investigate they began to uncover a conspiracy that seemingly involves every one of the alphabet agencies that infest Washington, D.C..  They uncover a plot that out does Iran Contra for sheer chutzpah.  The plot ranges all over the country and the atmosphere and involves people at all levels of government.  Maxwell ends up saving the life of a highly placed government employee.  Ultimately though this is a story of trust, between a father and son and partners.

Grade 10/10

What is with title of the review?  This is the latest in this series and it is five years old and I am wondering if there will be any follow up or if this is the last word from King and Maxwell.

 

unexpected consequences

Locking Up Our Own, Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman, Jr.; 2017; $27.00; 239 pages; Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, NY; 978-0-374-18997-6; checked out from Multnomah County Library, Central; 5/20/18-5/25/18

Why did I read this?  Back in 2016 I decided that I would read all the Pulitzer Prize winning books. LOCKING UP OUR OWN was the 2018 Pulitzer Prize winner for General Non-Fiction.

The author takes a look at what drove African Americans to vote for measures such as maximum and minimum sentences, three strikes and other strident anti-crime measures.  Even though these measures would have a strong effect on the African American population of the United States.  The United States only contains 5% percent of the worlds population, however we house 25% of the worlds prisoner.  The author looks at the effects the heroin and crack epidemics, and the violent crime that came with them, had on the African American population.  Crime was so rampant that the population thought these measures would be effective in curing crime.  However due to the systemic racism in our law enforcement and judicial systems there has been an explosion of numbers of African Americans imprisoned.  Unfortunately we often look at the short term solutions without thinking about the long term effects of what we are doing.

Grade 10/10

What is with the title of the review?  The population was looking for a solution for a crime wave and they imposed measures that helped stem the crime, but didn’t foresee the long term consequences.

a changed man

The Fallen by David Baldacci; 2018; $29.00; 417 pages; Grand Central Publishing, New York, NY; 978-1-5387-6139-7; checked out from Multnomah County Library, Kenton; 5/18/18-5/20/18

Why did I read this?  I have been trying to read through as many of David Baldacci’s series as I can and this is the last book in the Amos Decker series.

Amos Decker and Alex Jamison are on vacation in the rust belt of Pennsylvania when murders happen too close to home.  The unemployment mess, the opioid epidemic, fulfillment centers and robotic works all take center stage in this story.  Amos sees a dead body in the home behind Alex’s sisters home and the story is off and running.  The local police at first are resistant and then welcoming, but still reluctant.  The DEA becomes involved and jurisdictional things become part of the story.  This story has everything from buried treasure to life long animosity and everything in become.  Amos and Alex are a wonderful team.

10/10

What is with the title of the review?  Amos suffered a brain injury at the beginning of the series that gave him a photographic memory and causes him to associate colors with death and other sensations.  At one point in this story he is hit in the head and his injury again causes some things to change in his brain.

12 strong

Horse Soldiers, The Extraordinary Story of a Band of U.S. Soldiers Who Rode to Victory in Afghanistan by Doug Stanton; 2009; $18.00; 395 pages; Scribner, New York, NY; 978–1-4165-8052-2; checked out from Multnomah County Library, Hollywood; 5/9/18-5/18/18

Why did I read this?  Because I saw the trailer for “12 Strong”, which is the movie based on this book and I wanted to read the accurate account.

Shortly after the attacks on the World Trade Center on 9/11 12 U.S. Army Special Forces soldiers traveled to Afghanistan to assist the soldiers of the Afghan Northern Alliance in their guerrilla war against the Taliban.  When they reached the headquarters of the Northern Alliance Generals, they found the headquarters in a cave and an old mud fort.  When they traveled and entered the battlefield they did so on horseback.  Most of them had never ridden a horse before and suffered from saddle sores and sore limbs.  Most of them were not willing to show to the Afghans that they didn’t know how to ride and wanted to respect the Afghan militia and their customs.  They augmented the Afghans’ weapons, many of which were left behind by the Soviets, with some cutting edge guided bombs and other more modern equipment.  Both sides had left over Soviet weapons, although the higher technological weapons like tanks and jets were utilized by the Taliban.  At the point the story here ends the Northern Alliance had seemingly defeated the Taliban.  The way the US Army special forces worked alongside the Northern Alliance has become a model for how U.S. Troops can work with fighters from other cultures.  I hope the United States military does not forget the lessons they learned from the Horse Soldiers.

Grade 10/10

What is with the title of the review?  12 Strong is the title of the movie starring Chris Hemsworth that is based on this book.